With new club, students aid developing businesses

Some+Kiva+loans+go+to+cooperatives%2C+such+as+this+one+in+Central+Cambodia%2C+where+villagers+support+each+other+in+starting+small+businesses.+
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With new club, students aid developing businesses

Some Kiva loans go to cooperatives, such as this one in Central Cambodia, where villagers support each other in starting small businesses.

Some Kiva loans go to cooperatives, such as this one in Central Cambodia, where villagers support each other in starting small businesses.

photo by Carol Pucci - MCT Campus

Some Kiva loans go to cooperatives, such as this one in Central Cambodia, where villagers support each other in starting small businesses.

photo by Carol Pucci - MCT Campus

photo by Carol Pucci - MCT Campus

Some Kiva loans go to cooperatives, such as this one in Central Cambodia, where villagers support each other in starting small businesses.

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In Kenya, two parents are hopeful that their new farmers market will take off in order to provide for their growing family. In Peru, a young man works to fund his college tuition, in order to learn about modern agriculture and expand his small farm. The Social Entrepreneurship Club, a new addition at LB, opens up this world of global business and philanthropy to students.

“Social entrepreneurship is important because it helps to solve world problems…and injustice through…compassion, innovation, social activism and social awareness,” senior president Sara Gregg said.

For its first project, the club plans to collect dues to contribute to Kiva.org. Through Kiva, a non-profit organization, $25 donations are sent to businesses in a developing country of the lender’s choosing. After the business gains more momentum, it repays the loan.

“Sometimes it seems like people feel that you can either dedicate your life to helping others, or you can do something that betters your own, but you can’t do both,” senior vice president Mudd said.

The two students were inspired by John and Hank Green’s promotion of the website, Mudd said. On their YouTube Channel, “Vlog Brothers”, John, author of popular YA novel, The Fault in Our Stars, and his brother Hank, an entrepreneur, discussed the website.

While the club aims to foster new business, it also teaches club members about entrepreneurship, Gregg said.

“We will learn about the different types of business ventures there are, work to support entrepreneurs in developing countries, and understand how our business ideas can change the world,” Gregg said.

Along with Kiva, the club plans to work on other projects as well, Mudd said.

“The club will also include guest speakers, creating our own projects, and educating the student body about what exactly ‘social entrepreneurship’ means,” Mudd said.

According to Kiva’s website, the Social Entrepreneurship Club will be adding to over $600 million lent thus far. However, money isn’t the main idea, Mudd said.

“Ultimately, it’s about understanding that business doesn’t have to be solely for profit,” Mudd said. “You can go into business and still make a considerable impact on the lives of others through innovation and donations.”

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