Relationships graduate, too

Matt+Bowersox+and+Casey+Silva+celebrate+Silva%E2%80%99s+graduation.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Relationships graduate, too

Matt Bowersox and Casey Silva celebrate Silva’s graduation.

Matt Bowersox and Casey Silva celebrate Silva’s graduation.

photo courtesy of Matt Bowersox

Matt Bowersox and Casey Silva celebrate Silva’s graduation.

photo courtesy of Matt Bowersox

photo courtesy of Matt Bowersox

Matt Bowersox and Casey Silva celebrate Silva’s graduation.

Advertisement

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






In an age of highly realistic and logical ideals, many people believe that long distance relationships simply will not work out. According to a survey taken by a student at Albion College in Michigan in February 2013, only about 5 percent of college students have stayed with their high school sweethearts.

Coastal Carolina freshman Casey Silva and senior Matt Bowersox have been dating for a little more than a year now, and despite the 425.7 mile difference between the two, the relationship is still going strong.

“When you’re in love with a girl like [Silva], you don’t choose or try to be in situations like this,” Bowersox said. “We fell in love, and she went to school. My heart’s not gonna change just because she’s gone. It’s just tough.”

Couples are challenged with the change of not seeing each other everyday like they did in high school. But while distance can be an issue, students have found alternative ways to keep their romance alive.

Senior Mike Chase has been dating Virginia Tech freshman Isabella DeLuca for three and a half years now, and they have maintained a healthy relationship. Even though there is a 257-mile distance, they are able to remain close with care packages, calls every night and visits every couple of weeks.

“Isabella and I have been doing awesome with the long distance. Since she goes to Virginia Tech, it is easy to go up there every three weeks or so,” Chase said. “Nothing has felt difficult at all. I actually believe the distance helps. When you’re away from someone for a long time, it makes it so much better to see them.”

With half of the pair getting used to college life, sometimes it can be strenuous on both in a relationship when they are so far away, experiencing such different things.

Moore and University of Virginia freshman Kristen Monheim have only been dating for four and a half months, but they have a strong connection that has allowed them to continue their relationship into college.

“It’s not as bad as you would think because while she’s acclimating to college and to the stress of college, I am doing the exact same with senior year and the stress of [it] and applications and more,” senior Devin Moore said. “It is stressful being so far away from each other because when you really care about someone, you just want to be with them.”

Despite the odds and statistics going against them, these couples continued their relationship, allowing them to mature not only as a couple but as individuals.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email