Athletic trainers pick up the pieces

Athletic+trainer+Emily+Huss+works+on+junior+Annina+Zelkin%E2%80%99s+wrist.
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Athletic trainers pick up the pieces

Athletic trainer Emily Huss works on junior Annina Zelkin’s wrist.

Athletic trainer Emily Huss works on junior Annina Zelkin’s wrist.

photo courtesy of Tu Lam

Athletic trainer Emily Huss works on junior Annina Zelkin’s wrist.

photo courtesy of Tu Lam

photo courtesy of Tu Lam

Athletic trainer Emily Huss works on junior Annina Zelkin’s wrist.

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In the world of high school sports, the majority of attention is usually directed towards the players and coaches who steal the spotlight and gain the passion of their fans. But there are other important members, who play a crucial role in every athlete’s high school career. These members are the trainers, silent guardians who look out for and help protect all athletes that a school has. And this year at LB, the trainer staff has seen a lot of change.

After the 2013-14 sports seasons, which were highly successful and filled with multiple championships, the Bruins staff lost its most experienced athletic trainer: Meredith Sheeron.

Sheeron was a valuable and long time member of the athletic trainers at LB, who had a decade-long tenure as the lead athletic trainer.

Replacing Sheeron this year is Emily Huss, a trainer who was an active member of LB’s trainer workforce last year and played very important roles in injury prevention and recuperation. After becoming the full-time athletic trainer, the secondary position was left wide open, eventually being taken by Kelly Kavanaugh, who is also an instructional assistant (AI) at LB.

With a promotion to the full-time position, the work amount is slightly different from that of the part-time position.

“Our responsibilities are the same,” Huss said. “The only that’s really different is the full time technically works more hours than the part time.”

Regardless of this experience however, there a considerable amount of pressure added on after becoming the head of the trainer’s staff.

“There definitely is more responsibility as far as talking to coaches,” Huss said. “(We’re) making sure they’re all on the same page, organizing things and scheduling things.”

In a school with a population of more than 4,000 students, there are bound to be injuries, making a trainer’s life very strenuous at times.

“I would say [we see] anywhere between 20 and 30 kids a day,” Huss said.

Even though being the main trainer is a tough job at times, it is still an enjoyable at the end of the day.

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