From Boy Scout Up

Chris+Margraf+%28left%29+and+Liam+Kelly+%28right%29+backpack+in+the+New+Mexican+mountains
Back to Article
Back to Article

From Boy Scout Up

Chris Margraf (left) and Liam Kelly (right) backpack in the New Mexican mountains

Chris Margraf (left) and Liam Kelly (right) backpack in the New Mexican mountains

Phot Courtesy of Chris Margraf

Chris Margraf (left) and Liam Kelly (right) backpack in the New Mexican mountains

Phot Courtesy of Chris Margraf

Phot Courtesy of Chris Margraf

Chris Margraf (left) and Liam Kelly (right) backpack in the New Mexican mountains

Advertisement

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






For many young men, the title of Eagle Scout is a highly coveted honor. Whether they wish to become an Eagle Scout to make an impact on their community, it looks good on college applications, or just because it was just the next step in their Boy Scout career, they all had to go through the same requirement: a project that required hours of volunteer work, extensive planning, and a boatload of paperwork.

Senior Liam Kelly became an Eagle Scout for humanitarian reasons.

“I wanted to be an Eagle Scout because I wanted to help make a difference in my community, whether through service projects or leading the way for younger scouts, “ Kelly said. “The hardest part was definitely all of the paperwork and motivating myself to get it all done. I think alone I spent well over 200 hours from the point I started planning my project to when I submitted all of my paperwork.”

Senior Ryan Duffy just went with the flow of his scouting career.

“I never actually set out specifically to become an Eagle Scout until I was already halfway through the requirements,” Duffy said. “Until that point I had just been doing my best and enjoying scouting, and when I saw how close I was, I decided, ‘Why not?’”

For Duffy, the project wasn’t the hardest part of the process.

“The hardest part about earning Eagle wasn’t actually doing the project, but all the planning, paperwork, logistics, and boards for the review process,” Duffy said. “I personally spent approximately 100 hours on the project, and the project itself totalled with over 200 hours of volunteer service from about 50 scouts and friends.”

Senior Chris Margraff also became an Eagle Scout because it was the next step for him to complete in Boy Scouts.

“The hardest single part in becoming an Eagle Scout was my project,” Margraff said. “I painted the curb numbers in my neighborhood. I had to organize 30+ boys and adults to re-paint over 110 houses’ curb numbers. Overall though, it was the entire journey. It’s a marathon not a sprint. I had to work through all the requirements before Eagle in order to earn it. It’s a tough ride, but worth it.”

Senior Matt Lonam’s reason for becoming an Eagle Scout was more college oriented.

“I wanted to be an Eagle Scout because I knew it would be something that colleges would like to see,” Lonam said. “Also it’s something that not many people get and it feels really rewarding to know that I’ve reached my goal.”

There are various lessons to be learned from being an Eagle Scout.

“Some of the most important things I’ve learned have been to set an example, because you never know who is watching you, treat others with respect, so that they may learn from you and you from them, and finally I’ve learned to serve others cheerfully and selflessly,” Duffy said. “If you’d ask me my favorite part of being in Scouts, it would be seeing the kids who have come after me in the troop become the new leaders, because I had a hand in helping them get to that point.”

Becoming an Eagle Scout requires a tremendous amount of dedication and hard work, but can result in becoming a vocational leader and an expert outdoorsman. With public service one of their main pillars, Eagle Scouts devote hours of their time to better the lives of those around them.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email